The New Version of syngo.via Supports Treatment Decision-Making in Oncology

Siemens HealthcareCancer treatment is complex. The widely varying progressions of this disease require comprehensive diagnostics, an early check of treatment, and the exchange of information with colleagues. The new version of the diagnostics software syngo.via supports the treating physician in making decisions regarding treatment in oncology through a comprehensive portfolio of applications across imaging systems, treatments, and disciplines.

Imaging procedures play an important role in treatment planning. Multimodal image material not only provides information for a precise assessment of the tumor with regard to its position, morphology and metabolism, but it also forms the basis for radiotherapy planning. The application syngo.via RT Image Suite supports the radiotherapy oncologists in the demanding task of optimally using clinical images from various sources such as CT, MRT or PET-CT in order to contour the tumor to be irradiated and the surrounding tissue to be spared.

Another part of the oncology software portfolio is the application syngo.MR OncoCare. It allows an early, quantitative evaluation of the response of the tumor to the treatment. Thus, conclusions can be drawn about the success of the selected treatment method and, if necessary, this method can be adapted. Thus, the patient is spared from the continuation of ineffective treatment and the unnecessary costs associated with it.

In order to define the best possible treatment for each individual patient and successfully treat cancer, a wide variety of medical disciplines are drawn upon. Their representatives come together in regular, interdisciplinary meetings on this topic in so-called tumor boards. Syngo.MI Offline Oncoboard provides an IT solution in order to be able to present syngo.via findings of the various imaging procedures even on a standard PC and independently of a network connection.

syngo.via can be used as a standalone device or together with a variety of syngo.via-based software options, which are medical devices in their own right. syngo.via and the syngo.via based software options are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons its future availability cannot be guaranteed. Please contact your local Siemens organization for further details.

About Siemens AG
Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a major provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions as well as automation, drive and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading provider of medical imaging equipment - such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems - and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2014, which ended on September 30, 2014, Siemens generated revenue from continuing operations of €71.9 billion and net income of €5.5 billion. At the end of September 2014, the company had around 357,000 employees worldwide on a continuing basis.

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