Telehealth Can Reduce Deaths and Emergency Hospital Care

For people with long term conditions, telehealth can reduce deaths and help patients avoid the need for emergency hospital care, finds a study published on bmj.com. However, the estimated scale of hospital cost savings is modest and may not be sufficient to offset the cost of the technology, say the authors.

Telehealth uses technology to help people with health problems live more independently at home. For example, equipment to measure blood pressure or blood glucose levels at home can reduce hospital visits. Measurements are electronically transmitted to a health professional.

Several studies have been conducted on the impact of telehealth for people with long term conditions, but findings have been mixed. Some research suggests that telehealth can help patients develop a better understanding of their condition, leading to better quality and more appropriate care, as well as more efficient use of health care resources, but other studies have found negative effects.

However, assessing the scale of such an effect is complex.

So, an international team, led by researchers at the Nuffield Trust, set out to assess the impact of telehealth on hospital use for 3,230 patients with long term conditions (diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or heart failure) over one year.

The study is one of the largest telehealth studies ever conducted.

Patients were randomly split into two groups. A total of 1,570 intervention patients were given devices and taught how to monitor their condition at home and transmit the data to health care professionals. A further 1,584 control patients received usual care.

During the study period, significantly fewer (43%) of intervention patients were admitted to hospital compared with 48% of control patients. Significantly fewer (4.6%) of intervention patients died compared with 8.3% of controls. This equates to about 60 lives over a 12 month period.

There were also statistically significant differences in the mean number of emergency hospital admissions per head (0.54 for intervention patients compared with 0.68 for controls) and the mean hospital stay per head (4.87 days for intervention patients compared with 5.68 days for controls), although the authors say these findings should be interpreted with caution.

These differences remained significant after adjusting for several factors that could have influenced the results. However, the authors point out that these effects appear to be linked with short term increases in hospital use among control patients, the reasons for which are not clear.

They also say that the estimated cost savings are modest.

These results suggest that telehealth reduced mortality and helped patients avoid the need for emergency hospital care, conclude the authors. This may be because telehealth helps patients better manage their conditions and avoid a worsening of symptoms that may need emergency care. Other possibilities are that telehealth changes people's perception of when they need to seek additional support.

But they stress that these benefits need to be balanced against the cost of the technology itself and the level of savings that can be achieved.

In an accompanying editorial, Josip Car, Director of the Global eHealth Unit at Imperial College London and colleagues say this latest evidence doesn't warrant full scale roll-out but more careful exploration.

Although factors that might be important for successful telehealth can be described, "we need more clarity on how to interpret the relative contributions of these elements," they write.

They suggest that policy makers, commissioners, and guideline developers should help ensure that the research agenda focuses on areas where telehealth shows most promise. "There is great potential but also still much to be done," they conclude.

Effect of telehealth on use of secondary care and mortality: findings from the Whole System Demonstrator cluster randomised trial.
Steventon A, Bardsley M, Billings J, Dixon J, Doll H, Hirani S, Cartwright M, Rixon L, Knapp M, Henderson C, Rogers A, Fitzpatrick R, Hendy J, Newman S; for the Whole System Demonstrator Evaluation Team.
BMJ. 2012 Jun 21;344:e3874. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e3874.

Most Popular Now

Accenture HealthTech Innovation Challeng…

Accenture (NYSE: ACN) has named eight companies as finalists in the Accenture HealthTech Innovation Challenge, which brings together leading-edge startups with prominent health companies to tackle some of North America's...

Researchers Use AI to Predict which COVI…

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed an online tool to help medical staff quickly determine which COVID-19 patients will need help breathing with a ventilator. The tool, developed through...

Scientists Develop AI to Predict the Suc…

A study in which machine-learning models were trained to assess over 1 million companies has shown that artificial intelligence (AI) can accurately determine whether a startup firm will fail or...

Bittium Expands Its Minority Holdings in…

Bittium Biosignals Ltd, a subsidiary of Bittium Corporation, and British ECG service provider, Technomed Limited, have today signed an agreement under which Bittium will purchase a 25 percent stake in...

A Game Changer: Virtual Reality Reduces …

It isn’t a matter of one needle puncture. Many children coming through the doors of Children's Hospital Los Angeles are seen for chronic conditions and often require frequent visits. Painful...

Open Call HORIZON-HLTH-2022-IND-13-04: S…

This topic aims at supporting activities that are enabling or contributing to one or several expected impacts of destination 6 "Maintaining an innovative, sustainable and globally competitive health industry". To...

Siemens Healthineers AI-based COVID-19 S…

Through a year-long collaboration with a number of leading healthcare institutions across the globe, Siemens Healthineers has developed the Atellica COVID-19 Severity Algorithm,(1) a model designed to help predict the...

Ranking Apps on Privacy

The last thing you want to do when installing a new, free app on your phone is to scroll through pages of information on what kind of access to your...

Almost Two Thirds of Thoracic Oncologist…

Nearly two-thirds of thoracic oncologists surveyed indicated they used telehealth tools for the first time during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a report issued at the IASLC 2021 World Conference...

World First for AI and Machine Learning …

Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge along with 20 other hospitals from across the world and healthcare technology leader, NVIDIA, have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict COVID patients' oxygen needs on...

MEDICA 2021 + COMPAMED 2021: For the Res…

15 - 18 November 2021, Düsseldorf, Germany. The medical technology industry and its suppliers are looking forward to heading to the world's leading industry platforms, MEDICA 2021 and COMPAMED 2021, with...