S.O.S eHealth Initiative

ICT for HealthThe SOS project is a first step in addressing problems faced by doctors treating patients who seek health treatment when abroad. These problems include re-supplying essential medication that a patient has lost or forgotten, communicating medical situations to foreign-language doctors, diagnosing illness and prescribing proper medication with little knowledge of patient history.

Several Member States have implemented these services in their national healthcare systems and several others are about to do so. However, many of them cannot currently communicate with each other.

These services will only be widely used if they are trusted by both patients and healthcare professionals Appropriate data protection, system security and performance criteria need to be included in any cross border application.

The objective of the S.O.S. project is to ensure that these national solutions can "talk to each other". S.O.S. aims at enabling health professionals to electronically access the data of a patient from another country in their own language, using different technologies and systems. It will also make it possible for pharmacies to electronically process prescriptions from other Member States, so that patients travelling within the EU can obtain the essential medicine.

The project follows a bottom-up approach; it builds on existing technical solutions, and develops a set of specifications to ensure the interoperability of solutions, including security and identification systems and performance criteria.

The project will examine the level of maturity and deployment of patient summaries and ePrescriptions in the participating countries, and explore legal questions and develop technical specifications covering all basic components for a secure use of personal health data. In a second phase, the project will define, test and validate these solutions in real-life situations.

The approach will form the basis for a longer term, pan-European approach to building service solutions that will be able to work with each other.

The project responds to the commitment of Member States and the European Commission to achieve full interoperability of eHealth services. It will benefit from guidance provided by the Commission on making of electronic health record systems work together.

The Project Consortium is a broad coalition of stakeholders. It consists of 27 beneficiaries representing 12 EU Member States including ministries of health, national competence centres, a research institute and an industry team of more than 30 companies.

The SOS project has a total budget of over 23 million Euro for the next 3 years, 11 million of which is covered by the European Commission's Competitiveness and Innovation Programme, Programme to Support Policy (CIP-PSP).

During the lifetime of the project, the project will work in close cooperation with the CALLIOPE network (Call for Interoperable eHealth services in Europe) to ensure that benefits can be shared with non-participant countries.

The Calliope network will be consulted on specific topics during the project. CALLIOPE's activities will contribute to raise awareness and create consensus around the overall issue of interoperability of eHealth services.

For further information:
ICT for Health
European Commission - Information society and Media DG
Office: BU31 06/73 B-1049 Brussels
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel: +32 2 296 41 94
Fax: +32 2 296 01 81
http://europa.eu/information_society/eHealth

Related news articles:

Most Popular Now

IBM Watson Health Recognizes Top-Perform…

IBM (NYSE: IBM) Watson Health® announced its 2020 Fortune/IBM Watson Health 100 Top Hospitals list and 15 Top Health Systems award winners, naming the top-performing hospitals and health systems in...

Chatbots can Ease Medical Providers' Bur…

COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School...

Abbott Receives FDA Approval for New Hea…

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's next-generation Gallant™ implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) devices. The...

The New Tattoo: Drawing Electronics on S…

One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin. In a new study, University of Missouri...

Towards an AI Diagnosis Like the Doctor…

Artificial intelligence (AI) is an important innovation in diagnostics, because it can quickly learn to recognize abnormalities that a doctor would also label as a disease. But the way that...

SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Test from Siemens He…

Public Health England, in partnership with the University of Oxford, recently conducted a head-to-head evaluation of four commercial immunoassay tests available in the UK and used for the detection of...

Researchers Develop Software to Find Dru…

Washington State University researchers have developed an easy-to-use software program to identify drug-resistant genes in bacteria. The program could make it easier to identify the deadly antimicrobial resistant bacteria that...

Philips Introduces First-of-a-Kind Mobil…

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA), a global leader in health technology, today announced it introduced first-of-its-kind mobile Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in India. Designed to meet the critical-care requirements...

Proposed Framework for Integrating Chatb…

While the technology for developing artificial intelligence-powered chatbots has existed for some time, a new viewpoint piece in JAMA lays out the clinical, ethical, and legal aspects that must be...

Clinical-Grade Wearables Offer Continuou…

Although it might be tempting to rely on your fitness tracker to catch early signs of COVID-19, Northwestern University researchers caution that consumer wearables are not sophisticated enough to monitor...

World's Smallest Imaging Device has Hear…

A team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide and University of Stuttgart has used 3D micro-printing to develop the world's smallest, flexible scope for looking inside blood vessels...

Optimizing Neural Networks on a Brain-In…

Many computational properties are maximized when the dynamics of a network are at a "critical point", a state where systems can quickly change their overall characteristics in fundamental ways, transitioning...