Intel® Reader Launches in the UK: Bringing Printed Text to Spoken Word

ImageIntel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) announced UK availability of the Intel® Reader, a mobile handheld device designed to increase independence for people who have trouble reading standard print. In the UK, there are an estimated six million people with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties and two million people with visual impairments.

The Intel Reader, which is about the size of a paperback book, converts printed text into digital text, and then reads it aloud to the user. Its unique design combines a high-resolution camera with the power of an Intel® Atom™ processor, allowing users to point, shoot and listen to printed text. The Intel Reader will be available in the UK through select retailers, including Amazon.co.uk, HumanWare and Inclusive Technology.

When the Intel Reader is used together with the Intel® Portable Capture Station, large amounts of text, such as a chapter or an entire book, can be easily stored for reading later. Users will have convenient and flexible access to a variety of printed materials, helping to not only increase their freedom, but improve their productivity and efficiency at school, work and home.

The original concept for the Intel Reader came from Ben Foss, director of access technology, at Intel's Digital Health Group who like 10 percent of the UK population has dyslexia. Throughout school, college and university he had to depend on others to read to him or work through the slow process of getting words off a page himself. As an adult, much of the content he wanted, from professional journals to reading for leisure, just wasn’t available in audio form.

"As someone who is part of the dyslexic community, I am thrilled to be able to help level the playing field for people who, like me, do not have easy access to the printed word," Foss said. "Feelings of loneliness are often the consequence of not being able to read easily. We hope to open the doors for people in these communities. The Intel Reader is a tool that can help give people with dyslexia, partial sightedness, blindness or other reading or learning difficulties access to the resources they need to participate and be successful in school, work and life."

The British Dyslexia Association (BDA) and the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) both support the Intel Reader as an important advance in assistive technology.

Judi Stewart, chief executive, BDA said, "We are pleased that the Intel Reader is now available in the UK. This device has the potential to offer a great deal of independence to people who have a difficulty with reading. It allows you to read at your own pace, wherever and whenever needed, taking away the pressure and sometimes embarrassment of reading in public."

Steve Tyler, head of innovation and development, RNIB said, "It is great to see Intel developing a product that will allow more access to information for blind and partially sighted people as well as people who have other issues reading print. So much information is delivered in a print format and a device like this will help to break down barriers to accessing information. It is also great that the Intel Reader is portable so you can access more information when you're out and about."

Intel is also involved in the BDA's Mentoring scheme that aims to link adults with dyslexia with successful dyslexic people who will share the benefit of their experience and knowledge.

For further information, please visit:
http://www.intel.co.uk/reader

Related news articles:

About Intel
Intel (NASDAQ: INTC), the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

Most Popular Now

New Computational Model of Real Neurons …

Nearly all the neural networks that power modern artificial intelligence (AI) tools such as ChatGPT are based on a 1960s-era computational model of a living neuron. A new model developed...

Meet CARMEN, a Robot that Helps People w…

Meet CARMEN, short for Cognitively Assistive Robot for Motivation and Neurorehabilitation - a small, tabletop robot designed to help people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) learn skills to improve memory...

AI Matches Protein Interaction Partners

Proteins are the building blocks of life, involved in virtually every biological process. Understanding how proteins interact with each other is crucial for deciphering the complexities of cellular functions, and...

Mobile Phone Data Helps Track Pathogen S…

A new way to map the spread and evolution of pathogens, and their responses to vaccines and antibiotics, will provide key insights to help predict and prevent future outbreaks. The...

AI Model to Improve Patient Response to …

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool that can help to select the most suitable treatment for cancer patients has been developed by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU). DeepPT, developed...

Can AI Tell you if You Have Osteoporosis…

Osteoporosis is so difficult to detect in early stage it’s called the "silent disease." What if artificial intelligence could help predict a patient’s chances of having the bone-loss disease before...

Study Reveals Why AI Models that Analyze…

Artificial intelligence (AI) models often play a role in medical diagnoses, especially when it comes to analyzing images such as X-rays. However, studies have found that these models don’t always...

Think You're Funny? ChatGPT might b…

A study comparing jokes by people versus those told by ChatGPT shows that humans need to work on their material. The research team behind the study published on Wednesday, July 3...

Innovative, Highly Accurate AI Model can…

If there is one medical exam that everyone in the world has taken, it's a chest x-ray. Clinicians can use radiographs to tell if someone has tuberculosis, lung cancer, or...

New AI Approach Optimizes Antibody Drugs

Proteins have evolved to excel at everything from contracting muscles to digesting food to recognizing viruses. To engineer better proteins, including antibodies, scientists often iteratively mutate the amino acids -...

AI Speeds Up Heart Scans, Saving Doctors…

Researchers have developed a groundbreaking method for analysing heart MRI scans with the help of artificial intelligence (AI), which could save valuable NHS time and resources, as well as improve...

Young People Believe that AI is a Valuab…

Children and young people are generally positive about artificial intelligence (AI) and think it should be used in modern healthcare, finds the first-of-its-kind survey led by UCL and Great Ormond...