Call for papers: ISePHR 2006 - International Symposium on Electronic Personal Health Records

28th of September 2006,
Trondheim, Norway

Paper, poster and demo submission deadline 13th of August, 2006

Common and widespread Internet access changes the relationship between patients and health care providers, both in areas with well-developed and less developed care systems. The future of efficient healthcare relies on the competent, informed and self-caring patient.

The Personal Health Record is important in order to:

  • improve health information validity and quality control
  • increase patient involvement and enable preventive selfcare
  • ensure patient empowerment, and thus patient satisfaction and wellbeing
  • enable next-of-kin and caretaker involvement in the care for the elderly and aging population.
  • increase patient security and safety
  • enable patient and health service mobility and flexibility
  • ensure continuity where services are few and far apart
  • ensure cooperation where services are many, but fragmented
  • enable the future plan- and intention-aware cooperative core medical record

Goals and audience
The major goal of this symposium is to bring together users, researchers and developers, both from industry and academia, to study, explore and discuss the opportunities and challenges posed by electronic personal health records. We want to address all aspects of use and introduction of electronic personal health records, ranging from technical implementation, through privacy and juridical issues, to socio-economic implications and of course health care practice and policy.

An invited talk will be given by William Crawford, Health IT advisor to the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, with the title: "The Personal Health Record in US Healthcare Policy and the role of the Indivo (formerly Ping) project"

Contributions are sought in the form of experience reports, descriptions of solutions, surveys and trials, position papers, evaluations and demonstrations on topics including, but not limited to:

  • Patient mobility
  • Patient centered care
  • Plan based personal health records
  • Self reporting
  • Empowering patients to manage and improve their own health
  • Distributed patient records
  • Using mobile devices for healthcare information storage, update, and transmission
  • Therapy planning
  • Definitions of personal health record
  • Personal health record vs. health care providers record
  • Role of personal health records
  • Data models, information models, knowledge models for personal health records
  • How it will interact with a fully-functioning interoperable health system
  • Monitoring of health outside health care facilities
  • Patient education
  • Architecture

Important Dates

  • Submission of papers and posters: 13th of August, 2006
  • Notification: 20th of August, 2006
  • Camera ready copies: 1st of September, 2006
  • ISePHR symposium: 28th of September, 2006

For further information, submission details and registration, please visit:
http://events.idi.ntnu.no/isephr2006/

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