Health at a Glance: Europe 2016

This publication is the result of a close co-operation between the OECD and the European Commission and is the first step in the Commission's "State of Health in the EU" initiative to strengthen country-specific and EU-wide knowledge on health issues. The content, including the selection of key indicators of health and health systems, was agreed upon by the OECD and the Commission, based mainly on the European Core Health Indicators (ECHI), the Joint Assessment Framework on Health, and using the 2014 Commission Communication on effective, accessible and resilient health systems as reference framework. Its preparation was led by the OECD, but the Commission provided support throughout its preparation.

Life expectancy across EU member states has increased by more than six years since 1990, rising from 74.2 years in 1990 to 80.9 years in 2014, yet inequalities persist both across and within countries. People in Western European countries with the highest life expectancy continue to live over eight years longer, on average, than people in Central and Eastern European countries with the lowest life expectancy. Within countries, large inequalities in health and life expectancy also persist between people with higher levels of education and income and the more disadvantaged. This is largely due to different exposure to health risks, but also to disparities in access to high-quality care.

More than 1.2 million people in EU countries died in 2013 from illnesses and injuries that might have been avoided through more effective public health and prevention policies or more timely and effective health care. A wide range of actions are needed to address the many environmental and behavioural risk factors that are leading to premature deaths from diseases such as acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), lung cancer, stroke, alcohol-related deaths and other potentially avoidable deaths. Notable progress has been achieved in reducing tobacco consumption in most EU countries through a mix of public awareness campaigns, regulations and taxation. Yet, more than one in five adults in EU countries continues to smoke every day. It is also important to step up efforts to tackle the harmful use of alcohol and obesity, which are growing public health issues in many EU countries. More than one in five adults in EU countries reported in 2014 heavy alcohol drinking at least once a month. And one in six adults across EU countries was obese in 2014, up from one in nine in 2000.

The quality of care has generally improved in most EU countries, yet disparities persist. Improved treatments for life-threatening conditions such as heart attacks, strokes and several types of cancer have led to higher survival rates, but there is still room in many countries to improve the implementation of best practices in acute care and chronic care.

Download: Health at a Glance: Europe 2016 (2.447 KB).

Download from eHealthNews.eu: Health at a Glance: Europe 2016 (2.447 KB).

Most Popular Now

IBM Watson Health Recognizes Top-Perform…

IBM (NYSE: IBM) Watson Health® announced its 2020 Fortune/IBM Watson Health 100 Top Hospitals list and 15 Top Health Systems award winners, naming the top-performing hospitals and health systems in...

Chatbots can Ease Medical Providers' Bur…

COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School...

Abbott Receives FDA Approval for New Hea…

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's next-generation Gallant™ implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) devices. The...

The New Tattoo: Drawing Electronics on S…

One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin. In a new study, University of Missouri...

Towards an AI Diagnosis Like the Doctor…

Artificial intelligence (AI) is an important innovation in diagnostics, because it can quickly learn to recognize abnormalities that a doctor would also label as a disease. But the way that...

SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Test from Siemens He…

Public Health England, in partnership with the University of Oxford, recently conducted a head-to-head evaluation of four commercial immunoassay tests available in the UK and used for the detection of...

Researchers Develop Software to Find Dru…

Washington State University researchers have developed an easy-to-use software program to identify drug-resistant genes in bacteria. The program could make it easier to identify the deadly antimicrobial resistant bacteria that...

Philips Introduces First-of-a-Kind Mobil…

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA), a global leader in health technology, today announced it introduced first-of-its-kind mobile Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in India. Designed to meet the critical-care requirements...

Proposed Framework for Integrating Chatb…

While the technology for developing artificial intelligence-powered chatbots has existed for some time, a new viewpoint piece in JAMA lays out the clinical, ethical, and legal aspects that must be...

Clinical-Grade Wearables Offer Continuou…

Although it might be tempting to rely on your fitness tracker to catch early signs of COVID-19, Northwestern University researchers caution that consumer wearables are not sophisticated enough to monitor...

World's Smallest Imaging Device has Hear…

A team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide and University of Stuttgart has used 3D micro-printing to develop the world's smallest, flexible scope for looking inside blood vessels...

Optimizing Neural Networks on a Brain-In…

Many computational properties are maximized when the dynamics of a network are at a "critical point", a state where systems can quickly change their overall characteristics in fundamental ways, transitioning...